THE FOLLOWING IS A TRANSCRIPT OF THIS VIDEO. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CLICK HERE

Hi, this is Stewart Albertson with Albertson & Davidson and I want to talk to you about one of more difficult set of cases we come across and I call these the “Difficult Don’t Miss Undue Influence Cases”.  Let me say

THE FOLLOWING IS A TRANSCRIPT OF THIS VIDEO. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CLICK HERE

Hi, this is Stewart Albertson with Albertson & Davidson and I want to talk to you about undue influence cases.  What makes a good undue influence case and what makes a not-so-good undue influence case?  And let me just set this

THE FOLLOWING IS A TRANSCRIPT OF THIS VIDEO. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CLICK HERE

Hi, this is Keith Davidson at Albertson & Davidson.  And in this video, I want to discuss step-parents.  And I don’t mean to disparage step-parents, there’s a lot of very good step-parent and step-child relationships out there.  But, there’s also some

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Funny thing about Trustees, they are expected to seek help, just not too much help.  Generally, Trustees are not allowed to delegate their duties (see Probate Code section 16012).  The rules state that anything the Trustee can “reasonably” be required to personally perform cannot be delegated.  And the Trustee can never delegate the entire

Is an oral promise to make a will or trust enforceable under California law? Contrary to what many believe, California law provides for the enforcement of oral promises to make a will or trust.

How does the promise to make a will or trust arise? Generally, a parent orally promises a child, a friend, or

We spend a good deal of time discussing the shortcomings of individual Trustees.  But there are a few tips that beneficiaries should know to try to make a Trust administration go a little smoother.

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1. Patience is a Virtue.  It takes time to properly administer a Trust estate.  Assets have to be gathered together,

How do you get a private trustee to take action?  A parent dies, one or more of the kids take over as trustee, and nothing happens.  The assets of the Trust aren’t gathered together (called marshaling assets), notice is not given to the beneficiaries (as required under P.C. section 16061.7), beneficiaries are kept in the

I get calls every week from California Trust, Last Will, and Estate beneficiaries complaining that they can’t get their brother or sister, who is the Trustee and Executor of their parents’ estate plan, to provide copies of the parents’ estate plan after the parents have died.

I usually suggest the following. First, send a letter