One of the biggest benefits of creating a revocable, living Trust is that it allows your successor Trustee to manage your affairs if you lose capacity.  Sounds good, but who decides when your capacity is kaput?

That will be the question for the Court to decide on Monday, July 7th when a Los Angeles

Every Trustee and every Executor owe an absolute duty to account.  And a Trust or probate accounting is a unique animal—it’s unlike any other type of accounting and not every accountant and/or CPA knows how to properly prepare one.

1.   Charges and Credits: What goes in must equal what goes out.

Unlike a typical

I get calls every week from California Trust, Last Will, and Estate beneficiaries complaining that they can’t get their brother or sister, who is the Trustee and Executor of their parents’ estate plan, to provide copies of the parents’ estate plan after the parents have died.

I usually suggest the following. First, send a letter

I happen to represent the best private Trustee in the world.  No offense to professional Trustees—this does not include them.  In the world of private individuals who act as Trustees, not as a professional calling, but by way of happenstance or accident, there aren’t many who do such a good job.  It’s understandable, being a

We spend a good deal of time and effort discussing the mistakes Trustee’s make in administering California Trust’s.  From bad management, to problems investing assets, to misinformed or even bad Trustees.  But not all the blame for ugly Trust administrations lies with Trustees.  Beneficiaries can cause their share of problems too.

That’s what I call

Shouldn’t Trust administration be like a game of Simon says?  That’s the old school yard game where one person gives an instruction, but you’re only supposed to follow the instruction if it is preceded by the phrase, “Simon says.”  For example, Simon says, “Touch your nose.” Simon says, “Touch your toes.” Simon says, “Make proper